Saturday, October 31, 2015

ODDS & ENDS Vol. 8


William S. Burroughs • Ich Bin Von Kopf Bis Fuß 


Find it: Dead City Radio

Image: internet, unknown source

First week of November: The Crickets, Crying Sam Collins, Sister Wynona Carr, Champloose, Frank Edwards, Robert Lockwood, and The Midnighters. . . .

Friday, October 30, 2015

DEEP BLUE SEA BLUES

I wants to make this one right,
It’s the best one I got. . . .


Robert Petway • Catfish Blues • 1941



Tommy McClennan • Deep Blue Sea Blues • 1941


Catfish Blues: Robert Petway, vocal/guitar; prob. Alfred Elkins, imitation bass. Chicago, 28 March 1941

Deep Blue Sea Blues: Tommy McClennan, vocal/guitar; Joe McCoy, imitation bass. Chicago, 15 September 1941

Deep Blue Sea Blues” is on Before The Blues: The Early American Black Music Scene Vol. 2.

Lonesome Road Blues LP cover: Discogs


Wednesday, October 28, 2015

GIRL GROUPS DOWN FOR THE COUNT,
BROUGHT LOW BY A BAD CASE
OF THE BLUES, Pt 2


Buck Owens & Rose Maddox • Mental Cruelty • 1961


Buck Owens, vocal/guitar; Rose Maddox, vocal; Don Rich, fiddle; Ralph Mooney, steel guitar; George French Jr., piano; Allen Williams, bass; Marion “Pee Wee” Adams, drums. Hollywood, 16 January 1961

Monday, October 26, 2015

THE BLUES WHAT AM Pt 6

In the summer of 1942, on one of his field trips for the Library of Congress, Alan Lomax recorded members of the Silent Grove Baptist Church in Clarksdale, Mississippi. This song, with Bozie Sturdivant singing lead was issued as a 78 by the LOC and later appeared on an LP also issued by the Library of Congress. These records could be ordered direct from the LOC and in this way much of the wonderful music collected by Lomax and others began to be heard by young blues and folk music fans in the fifties and sixties. “Ain’t No Grave” is one of the timeless classics from those informal on-location recording sessions.



Bozie Sturdivant • Ain’t No Grave Can Hold My Body Down • 1942


Bozie Sturdivant, vocal; with congregational response. Clarksville, Mississippi, 25 July 1942

Get it: A Treasury Of Library Of Congress Field Recordings

78 label: Austin Granger/flickr

Sunday, October 25, 2015

HEARTACHES BY THE NUMBER

“Whitney Houston’s enormously popular 1992 recording of ‘I Will Always Love You’ showcased a preposterous attachment to static, stentorian vocal pyrotechnics. The result was an impressive performance but one that lacks any warmth or human-scale emotion. It’s like Aretha Franklin had taken singing lessons from Al Jolson.

“By contrast, [Dolly] Parton’s 1974 original is fragile, dynamic, forward-looking. . . . At the chorus, Dolly’s voice sounds confident even as it sheds tears; she knows it’s time to strike out on her own but her departure will be bittersweet just the same. . . .” —David Cantwell, Heartaches by the Number


331.  I Will Always Love You • Dolly Parton • 1974



Get it: I Will Always Love You: The Essential Dolly Parton, Vol. 1

Single picture sleeve: Wikipedia

Saturday, October 24, 2015

ODDS & ENDS Vol. 8


Cuarteto Coculense • La Malagueña • 1908


Get it: The Very First Recorded Mariachis: 1908–1909

Image: internet, unknown source

If you thought this was a hit-filled week, come back tomorrow for another seven days’ worth of musical fun and enlightenment with tunes by Dolly Parton, Bozie Sturdivant, Dolores Keane & John Faulkner, Buck Owens & Rose Maddox, Casey Bill Weldon, Robert Petway, and Tommy McClennan. And a very special guest appearance by none other than W. S. Burroughs.



Friday, October 23, 2015

THEY PUT ME IN THE COUNTY JAIL


Big Maceo • County Jail Blues • 1941


Big Maceo, vocal/piano; Tampa Red, guitar. Chicago, 24 June 1941

Find it: The Best of Big Maceo: The King of Chicago Blues Piano

CD cover: All Music

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Monday, October 19, 2015

THE BLUES WHAT AM Pt 6

This way of livin’ sure is hard,
Duckin’ and dodgin’ the Cadillac Squad. . . .


Lucille Bogan • They Ain’t Walking No More • 1930


Lucille Bogan, vocal; Charles Avery, piano. Chicago, late March 1930

Sunday, October 18, 2015

HEARTACHES BY THE NUMBER

“A working marriage meets the world of work, and lives to tell about it.

“‘I don’t know how to tell her that I didn’t get that raise in pay today,’ Charlie Rich begins, but you know that once his wife hears the weariness in his voice and sees his slumped shoulders and teary eyes, he won’t have to tell her anything. . . . Rich knew this sort of guilt and frustration only too well. . . . In Rich’s voice you can hear all the ambition and disappointment, all the love and obligation and guilt, of a real marriage. . . .” —David Cantwell in Heartaches by the Number

And, you might not have guessed it, but Charlie’s wife Margaret Ann wrote this song. . . .


25.  Life’s Little Ups and Downs • Charlie Rich • 1969


Get it: Feel Like Going Home: The Essential Charlie Rich

Charlie Rich image: YouTube

Saturday, October 17, 2015

ODDS & ENDS Vol. 8

About These Songs . . .

As evidenced by our front cover, not to mention the playlist that will make itself evident in the coming weeks, it will be instantly obvious that this latest volume, number 8, is our Dance Album for this year. All the tunes contained herein have long been favorites on dance floors across the land, whether a waltz, a blues, or a schottishe. And for those with a taste for exotic floor fillers we present Mlle. Silvia Vartan’s “Madison Twist,” a grand Gallic hit for her in 1962.

Of special note is the oldest extant recording, more than one hundred years old, of the song “Malagueña,” accorded top status in recent decades by Minnesota’s surfing Trashmen.

We have included a number of international ballroom favorites such as Marlene Dietrich’s “Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß auf Liebe eingestellt” and Nathan Abshire’s gigantic Cajun number one, “Ma Negresse.”

If you like your tunes “slow ‘n’ moody black & bluesy,” we also have “Open Up the Back Door” and “Pinegrove Blues.” In keeping with our goal of social relevancy is Ry Cooder’s recent tune, proving that all dance music does not require excess jollity.  —Irving Snerd, Station KBMJ, Lompoc   


Cat Power • I Believe in You • 2008


Get it: Jukebox

Image: internet, unremembered source

Coming next week: Crying Sam Collins, Richard Thompson, Robert & Johnny, Buck & Rose, 
Big Maceo, Cuarteto Coculense, and the next installment in our ongoing Heartaches by the Number series.

Friday, October 16, 2015

SHELBY COUNTY BLUES


Memphis Slim • Shelby County Blues • 1940

Memphis Slim, vocal/piano; Leroy Batchelor, string bass. Chicago, 30 October 1940

CD cover: All Music



Wednesday, October 14, 2015

GIRL GROUPS DOWN FOR THE COUNT,
BROUGHT LOW BY A BAD CASE
OF THE BLUES, Pt 2

Those “girl groups” are back for eight more weeks of misery, beginning with Timi Yuro’s 
1961 classic.


Timi Yuro • Hurt • 1961



Monday, October 12, 2015

THE BLUES WHAT AM Pt 6


“King” Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band • Sobbin’ Blues • 1923


You can cry your eyes out to “Sobbin’ Blues,” just one of 21 great tracks on R. Crumb’s Heroes of Blues, Jazz & Country
a book with CD published by Abrams ComicArts.

Sunday, October 11, 2015

HEARTACHES BY THE NUMBER

In the early- to mid-eighties I kind of picked up listening to country radio again in a city in the middle of the Pacific. It wasn’t much of a time to regain an interest in contemporary country music. Slick pop acts like T. G. Sheppard and Barbara Mandrell (she was country before it was cool) abounded. The Judds and Reba, however, were starting to rise, and a few records, like John Conlee’s “Rose Colored Glasses,” didn’t sound exactly like the country music of yore, but hit where it counted anyway. Into this mix came “hillbilly deluxe” John Anderson with his #1 hit “Swingin’.” The record itself was quite a mélange: deep soul horns, Hammond organ, girlie chorus, and leading the way was John Anderson’s deep-down-in-Florida twang, and his simple ode to sittin’ on the porch with Charlotte Johnson, just a-swangin’. To take the HBTN essay by David Cantwell a little out of context here, “What could be more perfect than that?”


John Anderson • Swingin’ • 1983


Frame grab: YouTube

Saturday, October 10, 2015

WADING THROUGH BLOOD AND WATER


Aaron Neville • Ave Maria • 1991


Get it: Warm Your Heart

Well, it took the better part of four months, but it looks like we’ve made it home. Next week “Odds and Ends” returns to its regular spot. . . .

Wednesday, October 07, 2015

D.P.R.B.—1960 EDITION


Connie Stevens • Sixteen Reasons • 1960



Thus concludeth the sixteen reasons why 1960 was such a great year for, in the immortal words of Bo Diddley, “Rock and rock and rock and roll, c’mon!” Next week in this space we resume our long running Girl Groups Down for the Count series.

Get it: Teenage Crush Volume 2.

Photo: Nikita Khrushchev, Roswell Garst, Guthrie County, Iowa, September 1959. Photo source: Bolshevik Mean Girls

Monday, October 05, 2015

THE BLUES WHAT AM Pt 6

In his Roots & Rhythm mail-order newsletter from October 2, 2013, proprietor Frank Scott reviews the Tompkins Square Cajun collection Let Me Play This for You. Of the song “Marksville Blues” by Blind Uncle Gaspard, Frank writes: “. . . a recently discovered 78 featuring singer/guitarist Blind Uncle Gaspard . . . is a real eye opener — the blues Marksville Blues . . . almost sounds like something from a Mississippi bluesman, only the lyrics are in French — really remarkable and incredibly soulful.” To that perfectly succinct description we add . . . nothing. Have a listen.


Blind Uncle Gaspard • Marksville Blues • 1929



Blind Uncle Gaspard, vocal/guitar; Delma Lachney, guitar. Chicago, c. 26 January 1929

Get it: Let Me Play This For You: Rare Cajun Recordings

Sunday, October 04, 2015

HEARTACHES BY THE NUMBER

“I’ve got my doubts about it”

“When Charley Pride began recording in 1966, his record company worked hard to hide the fact that he was a black man in a white industry. His photograph was absent from early press materials, and he was always referred to as ‘Country’ Charley Pride. . . . One listen to his chart debut, and there’s no mistaking Charley Pride for anything but country. . . . 
—David Cantwell, Heartaches by the Number   



Country Charley Pride • Just Between You and Me • 1966


“Just Between You and Me” is on The Essential Charlie Pride. If you can luck into a used copy, Charley’s live at Panther Hall album In Person has a great stripped down live version with a spoken intro that gives a good insight into the times.

Saturday, October 03, 2015

WADING THROUGH BLOOD AND WATER


Sam Cooke, S. R. Crain & The Soul Stirrers
Lead Me to Calvary (Rehearsal) / Lead Me to Calvary • 1964



Rehearsal: Sam Cooke, spoken explanation; Paul Foster, lead vocal; J. J. Farley, others unknown. Hollywood,  20 July 1964. Single: James Phelps, lead vocal; Jimmy Outler, tenor; Paul Foster (?), Richard Gibbs, Leroy Crume, baritones; Jesse James Farley, bass; with Linwood Mitchell, bass guitar; poss. Leroy Crume, guitar; unknown drums. possibly same session as rehearsal, c. 1964

Sam Cooke’s SAR Records Story 1959–1965 is where you’ll find the rehearsal of “Lead Me to Calvary.” The Soul Stirrers’ Joy In My Soul: The Complete SAR Recordings has the finished take.

Record label: Record Connexion

Week of October 4: Charley Pride, Blind Uncle Gaspard, J. B. Hutto, Connie Stevens, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, John Henry Barbee, Aaron Neville. Where else but on Blues All Kinds?

Thursday, October 01, 2015

SMYRNAIC BLACK HORSE BLUES


Johnny Twovoice & The Medallions
My Pretty Baby • 1955


You can hear both of Johnny Morisette’s voices on Dootone Doo Wop Volume 1.

Image: Japanese women walk through ruins of Hiroshima, August 1945