Thursday, July 31, 2014

MR. MAN, MR. BOY, MISS GAL, MISS WOMAN,
OH, PLAY THAT THING!


Joe Venuti’s Blue Four • Sensation • 1928



Joe Venuti, violin; Rube Bloom, vocal/piano; Jimmy Dorsey, clarinet/alto sax/baritone sax; Eddie Lang, guitar; poss. Justin Ring, drums.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

PAS D’ESPAN

“So Nodiff calls me up: ‘Dave, can you play a Russian session?’ ‘Yeah.’ ‘Good, so you’ll come down next week and make a Russian session.’ So I went; I make. Two weeks later I make another Jewish session with Schwartz; whatever Nodiff gave me: Russian, Polish, Greek . . .” — Clarinetist Dave Tarras on his early sessions as a sideman; from Henry Sapoznik’s notes to Dave Tarras: Yiddish-American Klezmer Music—1925–1956 (Yazoo, 1992).


Russkyj Orkestr “Moskva” • Pas D'Espan • 1925

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Sunday, July 27, 2014

THE GONE DEAD TRAIN


King Solomon Hill • The Gone Dead Train • 1932

Saturday, July 26, 2014

LONESOME DAY BLUES

Here’s an oddly titled number from Doug Sahm and the Quintet’s 1969 LP Together After Five. It starts out as a shambling take on “Duncan and Brady” that somehow becomes Leadbelly’s “Out on the Western Plains” before it’s over.


Sir Douglas Quintet • Medley : Son Of Bill Baety • 1969




Well, another week’s done and gone. A new one’s starting up at midnight, and so is BAK, spinning more great and crazy tunes for you, leading out with the “Gone Dead Train.” Following that we’ll be gathering dead flowers for Caitlin Rose, rockin’ out with the Clément brothers, spluttering wild with Joe Venuti and his Blue Four, and tagging along to a Dave Tarras gig with the Orkestr “Moskva”. As August rolls around we’ll hear another great, nostalgic hapa-haole tune from Marty Robbins featuring typically atmospheric lap steel, and then finish out the week workin’ the Kremlin alongside Roky Erickson and The Explosives.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

DIRECT TO YOU FROM THE CLUB BIZARRE

When I first heard the issued single version of this song on a Blues Classics LP c.1968 I went completely tilt and thought I was going to fall off this spinning globe they call the earth. Five decades later it still has that effect on me when I listen to it. Here is a preliminary version, no less intense, recorded around the same time as the single on portable equipment at the Club Bizarre in Canton, Mississippi, January 1952. Lotta noise being made by just three musicians: Elmore James, with Ike Turner on piano and an unknown drummer.


Elmore James • Please Find My Baby (Version 1) • 1952




Wednesday, July 23, 2014

ODDS & ENDS Vol. 3


Chambers Brothers • Bottle Music / I Got It • 1965

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

THE RHYTHM OF THAT HARLEM HI-DE-HI-DE


Tampa Red • When I Take My Vacation In Harlem • 1935



Tampa Red, vocal/guitar/kazoo; Black Bob, piano; poss. Bill Gaither, string bass. Chicago, 1 Nov 1935

Monday, July 21, 2014

BESAME MUCHO

This one’s enjoyable for me as much for the Saturday morning cartoons feel of Manuel Gavinovich’s vocals as it is for the terrific playing of Oscar Alemán and his hot quinteto.


Oscar Aleman y su Quinteto de Swing • Besame Mucho • 1943



Photo: Oscar Alemán with Josephine Baker, 1933 via Escutache Esto!



Sunday, July 20, 2014

BIRMINGHAM JAIL

Those chirpy De Zurik Sisters are back—wait! they’ve never been on Blues All Kinds before—with a great not-quite-yodeling version of “Birmingham Jail.” And if you like this one, they will be back soon with their justly famous “Arizona Yodeler.”


The De Zurik Sisters (Caroline & Mary Jane)
Birmingham Jail • 1938

Saturday, July 19, 2014

LONESOME DAY BLUES


Freddy Fender • Wasted Days and Wasted Nights • 1975




Tomorrow begins a brand new week, and we’ve got 7 brand new old songs for you to enjoy, by BAK favorites the De Zurik Sisters, the Chambers Brothers, Oscar Alemán, Waylon Jennnings, Tampa Red, Sir Douglas Quintet, and . . . Elmore James!

Thursday, July 17, 2014

ODDS & ENDS Vol. 3


Cat Power • Lost Someone • 2008




Not to worry, folks—James Brown is up tomorrow!

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

IT’S WAY BEYOND REPAIR


Buddy Miller • You Wrecked Up My Heart • 1995



Buddy Miller, vocal/guitars; Lucinda Williams, vocal; Al Perkins, lap steel; Tammy Rogers, fiddle; Gurf Morlix, bass; Donald Lindley, drums.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

WE SHALL BE FREE


Leadbelly • We Shall Be Free • 1944
with Woody Guthrie, Cisco Houston, and Sonny Terry



Have a listen to Frank Stokes’ 1927 version here.

LP cover image: Discogs

Monday, July 14, 2014

BLOWIN’ DOWN THAT OLD DUSTY ROAD

Today is Woody Guthrie’s 102nd birthday, as well as Bastille Day in France. It’s also three years since Blues All Kinds started up (originally as BB’s Magic Jukebox). Thanks to the very few brave souls who continue to visit this place and make it worth our while spinning records for you. Yesterday we heard Woody’s “Jesus Christ,” possibly more relevant now than when he wrote it in the 1940s; today Cisco Houston sings Woody’s “Blowin’ Down the Road;” tomorrow we’ll hear Woody, Leadbelly, and the gang sing and play their rendition of “We Shall Be Free.”  To finish out the week we have Buddy Miller and Lucinda Williams, Cat Power, James Brown, and Freddy Fender lined up, so don’t go ’way. . . .


Cisco Houston • Old Dusty Road • 1958

Sunday, July 13, 2014

SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON
LATTER RAIN EDITION

“I wrote this song looking out of a rooming house window in New York City in the winter of 1940. I saw how the poor folks lived, and then I saw how the rich folks lived, and the poor folks down and out and cold and hungry, and the rich ones out drinking good whiskey and celebrating and wasting handfuls of money at gambling and women, and I got to thinking about what Jesus said, and what if He was to walk into New York City and preach like he use to. They’d lock Him back in Jail as sure as you're reading this. ‘Even as you've done it unto the least of these little ones, you have done it unto me.’” —Woody Guthrie, notes in Folkways Archives


Woody Guthrie • Jesus Christ • 1940s

Saturday, July 12, 2014

THE VICKSBURG–FORTY FOUR BLUES SAGA—No 8

“Why, hello there, Roosevelt.”

“Why, hello there, Lee Green. Why, how you got ’em this mornin’?”

“Oh, pretty good, boy; I don’t feel so good.”

“Well, I know about the reason you don’t feel so good, because I seed your gal catch that number 44 train this mornin’, and I just about know ‘bout how you feelin’. You oughta feel just about well enough to pick me them ‘Number 44 Blues’ down to a gravy.”

“Oh, I’ll pick ’em for you, boy, because I kinda got ’em myself, doggone it.”



Lee Green • Train Number 44 • 1930



Willie Kelly • Kelly’s 44 Blues • 1930



Lee Green, vocal/piano; Roosevelt Sykes, speech. Chicago, 4 Nov 1930

Willie Kelly (Roosevelt Sykes), vocal/piano. Cincinnati, 12 Jun 1930 

Photo: Roosevelt Sykes, c.late 1920s via American Music

Friday, July 11, 2014

AIN’T NOBODY’S BUSINESS, KID


Frank Stokes • ’Taint Nobody’s Business—Part 2
(take 1, unissued) • 1928



Frank Stokes, vocal/guitar; Dan Sane, guitar. Memphis, 30 Aug 1928

Thursday, July 10, 2014

DENVER BLUES


Tampa Red • Denver Blues • 1934

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

ODDS & ENDS Vol. 3


John Hammond & The Nighthawks
Sweet Home Chicago • 1979

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

DINOSAURIC PRECEPTION ROADMAP BLUES

Pie in the sky, bye and bye, maybe! According to some folks, only 144,000 gonna have a wonderful time up there oh glory hallelujah. Still, we got a couple of good ones for you today, and this isn’t Sunday School. Countin’ ’em down with gusto: Sleepy LaBeef and Dot Love. . . .


Sleepy LaBeef • Wonderful Time Up There • 1980


The Original Gospel Harmonettes • These Are They • 1952


Sleepy LaBeef, vocal/guitar; Cliff Parker, guitar; Phil Breeding, acoustic bass; Richard Shook, electric bass; Terry Duncan, piano; David Humphreys, drums. Nashville, c.1980

Dorothy Love (lead vocal); Mildred Miller, Odessa Edwards, Willie Mae Newberry Garth, Vera Kolb (vocals); Evelyn Starks Hardy, piano; unknown organ, drums. Hollywood, 11 Jul 1951

Get “These Are They”: The Best of Dorothy Love Coates and The Original Gospel Harmonettes

Label picture: 45cat

Monday, July 07, 2014

LIVIN’ DANGEROUSLY, BABY


Tommy & The Derby’s • Standin’ In My Way • 1965

Sunday, July 06, 2014

LONESOME DAY BLUES


Emright & Mattie
That Minute There With You • c.mid-1960s

Saturday, July 05, 2014

LONESOME DAY BLUES


The Ventures • Moon Of Manakoora • 1961




Here’s the lineup for the coming week, famous, infamous, and never-heard-ofs: Emright and Mattie, Tommy & The Derbys, Sleepy LaBeef, Dorothy Love, John Hammond, Tampa Red, and Frank Stokes, along with another installment in our “44 Blues” series featuring Lee Green and Roosevelt Sykes!

Friday, July 04, 2014

ON INDEPENDENCE DAY

And now, for something completely different. . . .


Martina McBride • Independence Day • 1994


I’m placing this lapse in musical snootiness squarely on the shoulders of David Cantwell and Bill Friskics-Warren and their intriguing and ear-opening book Heartaches by the Number: Country Music’s 500 Greatest Singles

Thursday, July 03, 2014

LEAHI

Ray Kinney again, heard here a couple of months ago extolling the virtues of Haleakala on Maui, now singing the praises of Diamond Head (Leahi). And today’s music is accompanied by an utterly charming photo of a very young Princess Kaiulani, from the Hawai‘i State Archives.


Ray Kinney with Dick McIntire & His Harmony Hawaiians
Leahi (Diamond Head Hula) • 1936



Photo: Princess Kaiulani, “approximately six years old seated holding hat with backdrop of Diamond Head & palm trees in a photo studio,” c.1881. Wikimedia Commons/Hawaii State Archives. Call Number: PP-96-9-019.

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

NEVER TURN BACK

Here’s one to shake up your Tuesday morning. Archie Brownlee and Rev. Percell Perkins at your service. . . .


The Five Blind Boys • Never Turn Back • 1948



Archie Brownlee, Lawrence Abrams, tenors; Rev. Percell Perkins, Lloyd Woodard, baritones; Joseph Ford, bass. Newark, c.1948