Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Monday, July 28, 2014

CAJUN ROCK’N’ROLL

Somewhere around 1970 I played this Terry Clément track along with a few others for a Louisiana transplant in Richmond, Virginia, and he sniffily told me it wasn’t Cajun music, it was rock’n’roll. Whatever it was/is, it’s a good one, and everyone involved is fully letting the bon temps roll.


Terry Clement & His Rhythmic Five
La Valse De Te Maurice • 1954



Terry Clément, accordion; Purvis Clément, vocal/fiddle; Marshall Arceneaux, guitar; Ronnie Goudreaux, drums; Jerry Dugas, steel guitar.

Sunday, July 27, 2014

THE GONE DEAD TRAIN


King Solomon Hill • The Gone Dead Train • 1932

Saturday, July 26, 2014

LONESOME DAY BLUES, No. 10

Here’s an oddly titled number from Doug Sahm and the Quintet’s 1969 LP Together After Five. It starts out as a shambling take on “Duncan and Brady” that somehow becomes Leadbelly’s “Out on the Western Plains” before it’s over.


Sir Douglas Quintet • Medley : Son Of Bill Baety • 1969




Well, another week’s done and gone. A new one’s starting up at midnight, and so is BAK, spinning more great and crazy tunes for you, leading out with the “Gone Dead Train.” Following that we’ll be gathering dead flowers for Caitlin Rose, rockin’ out with the Clément brothers, spluttering wild with Joe Venuti and his Blue Four, and tagging along to a Dave Tarras gig with the Orkestr “Moskva”. As August rolls around we’ll hear another great, nostalgic hapa-haole tune from Marty Robbins featuring typically atmospheric lap steel, and then finish out the week workin’ the Kremlin alongside Roky Erickson and The Explosives.

Friday, July 25, 2014

DINOSAURIC PRECEPTION ROADMAP BLUES No. 93

Waylon Jennings, recorded in Phoenix a few months before signing with RCA, and beating Roy Orbison at his own unbeatable game. . . .


Waylon Jennings • Crying • 1964

Thursday, July 24, 2014

DIRECT TO YOU FROM THE CLUB BIZARRE

When I first heard the issued single version of this song on a Blues Classics LP c.1968 I went completely tilt and thought I was going to fall off this spinning globe they call the earth. Five decades later it still has that effect on me when I listen to it. Here is a preliminary version, no less intense, recorded around the same time as the single on portable equipment at the Club Bizarre in Canton, Mississippi, January 1952. Lotta noise being made by just three musicians: Elmore James, with Ike Turner on piano and an unknown drummer.


Elmore James • Please Find My Baby (Version 1) • 1952




Wednesday, July 23, 2014

ODDS & ENDS Vol. 3 No. 10


Chambers Brothers • Bottle Music / I Got It • 1965